Changeset 968933d for BOOK/bootable


Ignore:
Timestamp:
Jun 3, 2009, 12:23:23 AM (11 years ago)
Author:
Chris Staub <chris@…>
Branches:
clfs-1.2, clfs-2.1, clfs-3.0.0-systemd, clfs-3.0.0-sysvinit, master, systemd, sysvinit
Children:
093b0e8
Parents:
984ac82
Message:

Text updates

Location:
BOOK/bootable
Files:
6 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • BOOK/bootable/alpha/aboot.xml

    r984ac82 r968933d  
    1616  </indexterm>
    1717
    18   <para os="a">Create a <filename>aboot.conf</filename> file defining aboot's boot
     18  <para os="a">Create an <filename>aboot.conf</filename> file defining aboot's boot
    1919  menu:</para>
    2020
  • BOOK/bootable/alpha/kernel.xml

    r984ac82 r968933d  
    2727
    2828    <para os="a3">The following sed prevents GCC from treating warnings as
    29     errors when the kernel is compiled.</para>
     29    errors when the kernel is compiled:</para>
    3030
    3131<screen os="a4"><userinput>sed -i "s/-Werror//" arch/alpha/kernel/Makefile</userinput></screen>
  • BOOK/bootable/mips/arcload.xml

    r984ac82 r968933d  
    4343EOF</userinput></screen>
    4444
    45   <para os="c">Now we use dvhtool to make the system bootable:</para>
     45  <para os="c">Now we use <command>dvhtool</command> to make the system
     46  bootable:</para>
    4647
    4748<screen os="d"><userinput>dvhtool --unix-to-vh /usr/lib/arcload/sash sash
  • BOOK/bootable/mips64/arcload.xml

    r984ac82 r968933d  
    4343EOF</userinput></screen>
    4444
    45   <para os="c">Now we use dvhtool to make the system bootable:</para>
     45  <para os="c">Now we use <command>dvhtool</command> to make the system
     46  bootable:</para>
    4647
    4748<screen os="d"><userinput>dvhtool --unix-to-vh /usr/lib/arcload/sash64 sash64
  • BOOK/bootable/ppc/yaboot.xml

    r984ac82 r968933d  
    2929  in preparation for this step. The procedure involves writing the bootloader
    3030  to a bootstrap partition and blessing it so that Open Firmware will boot from
    31   it.  This is all handled by <command>ybin</command> the yaboot installer.</para>
     31  it.  This is all handled by <command>ybin</command>, the yaboot installer.</para>
    3232
    3333  <para os="d">Ybin writes an optional 'OS selector' menu into Open Firmware,
    34   then writes yaboot and yaboot.conf to the bootstrap partition, blesses this,
    35   and updates the boot device recorded in nvram. When booted, the OF provides
    36   the initial menu to choose between linux, boot from CD, and e.g. OSX
    37   (depending on what was in yaboot.conf). If you boot to 'linux', yaboot is
    38   executed and lets you select which kernel to use.</para>
     34  then writes yaboot and <filename>yaboot.conf</filename> to the bootstrap
     35  partition, blesses this, and updates the boot device recorded in nvram. When
     36  booted, the OF provides the initial menu to choose between linux, boot from
     37  CD, and e.g. OSX (depending on what was in <filename>yaboot.conf</filename>).
     38  If you boot to 'linux', yaboot is executed and lets you select which kernel
     39  to use.</para>
    3940
    4041  <para os="e">Images (kernels) are specified, together with any necessary path,
    41   in yaboot.conf - the details are incorporated into the bootloader, but no attempt
    42   is made to access or validate the paths until they are selected.  There are many
    43   possible options that can be specified in yaboot.conf, see the man page for the
    44   details.  Most people will be able to specify device=hd: (for a single hard disk),
    45   but if you have multiple disks, or if you wish to be pedantic, you can specify the
     42  in <filename>yaboot.conf</filename> - the details are incorporated into the
     43  bootloader, but no attempt is made to access or validate the paths until
     44  they are selected. There are many possible options that can be specified in
     45  <filename>yaboot.conf</filename>, see the man page for the details. Most
     46  people will be able to specify device=hd: (for a single hard disk), but if
     47  you have multiple disks, or if you wish to be pedantic, you can specify the
    4648  full OF path to the device, obtained by running <command>ofpath /dev/hdX</command>
    4749  .</para>
    4850
    4951  <para os="h">Using the above information, determine the appropriate designators
    50   for the bootstrap partition and the root partition.  For the following example,
     52  for the bootstrap partition and the root partition. For the following example,
    5153  it is assumed that the bootstrap partition is <filename class="partition">hda2
    52   </filename> and the root partition is <filename class="partition">hda7</filename>
    53   We will also assume that you wish to be able to boot an OSX installation on
    54   <filename class="partition">hda4</filename>.  Change these items as necessary
     54  </filename> and the root partition is <filename class="partition">hda7</filename>.
     55  We will also assume that you wish to be able to boot an OSX installation on
     56  <filename class="partition">hda4</filename>. Change these items as necessary
    5557  for your machine.</para>
    5658
    5759  <para os="i">If your machine has a SATA disk, specify the partitions using
    5860  <filename class="devicefile">/dev/sda7</filename> and so forth in the usual
    59   way.  At least some of the distros specify a full OF path to the 'device' and
     61  way. At least some of the distros specify a full OF path to the 'device' and
    6062  to the image(s), such as
    6163  <parameter>device=/ht@0,f2000000/pci@3/k2-sata-root@c/k2-sata@0/disk@0:</parameter>
  • BOOK/bootable/x86_64-64/lilo.xml

    r984ac82 r968933d  
    1717
    1818    <para os="a">Your shiny new CLFS system is almost complete. One of the
    19       last things to do is to ensure that the system can be properly
    20       booted. The instructions below apply only to computers using Lilo,
    21       which in the context of this book means x86_64 Pure64 systems.
    22       Information on <quote>boot loading</quote> for other architectures
    23       should be available in the usual resource-specific locations for
    24       those architectures.</para>
     19    last things to do is to ensure that the system can be properly booted. The
     20    instructions below apply only to computers using Lilo, which in the
     21    context of this book means x86_64 Pure64 systems. Information on
     22    <quote>boot loading</quote> for other architectures should be available in
     23    the usual resource-specific locations for those architectures.</para>
    2524
    2625  <xi:include xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2003/XInclude"
     
    2827  xpointer="xpointer(//*[@os='b'])"/>
    2928
    30     <para os="c">If you have multiple systems on your machine using a
    31       different bootloader such as GRUB, you may prefer to use that
    32       instead - consult the appropriate documentation.  The rest of
    33       this section assumes you are going to use Lilo.</para>
     29    <para os="c">If you have multiple systems on your machine using a different
     30    bootloader such as GRUB, you may prefer to use that instead - consult the
     31    appropriate documentation. The rest of this section assumes you are going
     32    to use Lilo.</para>
    3433
    3534    <para os="d">Earlier, we compiled and installed the Lilo boot loader
    36       software in preparation for this step. The procedure involves
    37       writing a boot image to a specific location on the hard drive.
    38       We highly recommend using mkrescue to create a Lilo boot CD
    39       (using e.g. dvdrecord from dvdrtools) as a backup (this requires
    40       loopback block device support in the kernel).</para>
     35    software in preparation for this step. The procedure involves writing a
     36    boot image to a specific location on the hard drive. We highly recommend
     37    using <command>mkrescue</command> to create a Lilo boot CD (using e.g.
     38    <command>dvdrecord</command> from dvdrtools) as a backup (this requires
     39    loopback block device support in the kernel).</para>
    4140
    42     <para os="e">Normally, you interact with Lilo by using the cursor
    43       and <literal>enter</literal> keys to select from the available
    44       option(s), but sometimes it is necessary to add other boot
    45       options, such as e.g. 'init=/bin/bash' to debug boot failures.
    46       The more your keyboard layout differs from the US qwerty layout,
    47       the harder it becomes to type boot options unless Lilo knows
    48       about your keyboard layout. So, we will create a key table for
    49       Lilo (.ktl) file - at one point in the documentation these are
    50       referred to as .klt files, which may be a typo, but has been
    51       followed by some distros.  The name, and location, are not
    52       important but it is conventional to put these in /boot with
    53       the name representing the key layout.  For a British keyboard
    54       layout, the following command will achieve this:</para>
     41    <para os="e">Normally, you interact with Lilo by using the cursor and
     42    <literal>enter</literal> keys to select from the available option(s), but
     43    sometimes it is necessary to add other boot options, such as e.g.
     44    'init=/bin/bash' to debug boot failures. The more your keyboard layout
     45    differs from the US qwerty layout, the harder it becomes to type boot
     46    options unless Lilo knows about your keyboard layout. So, we will create a
     47    key table for Lilo (.ktl) file - at one point in the documentation these
     48    are referred to as .klt files, which may be a typo, but has been followed
     49    by some distros. The name, and location, are not important but it is
     50    conventional to put these in <filename class="directory">/boot</filename>
     51    with the name representing the key layout. For a British keyboard layout,
     52    the following command will achieve this:</para>
    5553
    5654<screen os="f" role="nodump"><userinput>keytab-lilo.pl uk >/boot/uk.ktl</userinput></screen>
    5755
    58     <para os="g">The argument to the command is the name of the keymap,
    59       or if necessary you can specify the full path to the keymap.  Use
    60       whatever is appropriate for your keyboard.</para>
     56    <para os="g">The argument to the command is the name of the keymap, or if
     57    necessary you can specify the full path to the keymap. Use whatever is
     58    appropriate for your keyboard.</para>
    6159
    62     <para os="h">When the x86 CLFS book used to include Lilo, it
    63     advised against running it from chroot in case the MBR became
    64     corrupted. Provided you have /proc mounted and have device special
    65     files for the disks, it seems to be safe to run recent versions of
    66     Lilo in chroot, although it is always possible that an updated
    67     bootloader, or defective configuration file, may render the system
    68     unbootable.</para> 
     60    <para os="h">When the x86 CLFS book used to include Lilo, it advised
     61    against running it from chroot in case the MBR became corrupted.
     62    Provided you have <filename class="directory">/proc</filename> mounted
     63    and have device special files for the disks, it seems to be safe to run
     64    recent versions of Lilo in chroot, although it is always possible that
     65    an updated bootloader, or defective configuration file, may render the
     66    system unbootable.</para> 
    6967
    70     <para os="i">The next step is to create /etc/lilo.conf:</para>
     68    <para os="i">The next step is to create
     69    <filename>/etc/lilo.conf</filename>:</para>
    7170
    7271<screen os="j" role="nodump"><userinput>cat &gt; /etc/lilo.conf &lt;&lt; "EOF"
     
    10099
    101100    <para os="k">Replace &lt;bootdisk&gt; with the name of the disk (or
    102       partition) on which the boot sector is to be written, e.g. sda.
    103       Replace &lt;keytable&gt; with the name of the keytable file you
    104       created, and &lt;partition&gt; with the name of the root partition
    105       for the new system.
     101    partition) on which the boot sector is to be written, e.g. sda.
     102    Replace &lt;keytable&gt; with the name of the keytable file you
     103    created, and &lt;partition&gt; with the name of the root partition
     104    for the new system.
    106105    </para>
    107106
     
    116115
    117116  <note os='o'>
    118     <para>People who have been used to GRUB need to be aware that
    119       Lilo works differently - in particular, you cannot edit the
    120       available choices as you can in the <command>grub</command> shell,
    121       and Lilo records the block addresses of the kernels into the boot
    122       blocks each time /sbin/lilo is run. This means that when you
    123       compile a new kernel, you have to add it to /etc/lilo.conf and
    124       rerun /sbin/lilo.  It also means that if you recompile an existing
    125       kernel and save it to the same name you still have to rerun /sbin/lilo
    126       in case it now occupies different blocks on the filesystem.</para>
     117    <para>People who have been used to GRUB need to be aware that Lilo works
     118    differently - in particular, you cannot edit the available choices as you
     119    can in the <command>grub</command> shell, and Lilo records the block
     120    addresses of the kernels into the boot blocks each time
     121    <command>/sbin/lilo</command> is run. This means that when you compile a
     122    new kernel, you have to add it to <filename>/etc/lilo.conf</filename> and
     123    rerun <command>/sbin/lilo</command>. It also means that if you recompile
     124    an existing kernel and save it to the same name you still have to rerun
     125    <command>/sbin/lilo</command> in case it now occupies different blocks on
     126    the filesystem.</para>
    127127  </note>
    128128
    129     <para os="p">If you are running multiple systems on this box and
    130     using Lilo, it is a good idea to ensure that each system is running
    131     the same version of Lilo, otherwise an old version may not be able
    132     to overwrite the bootloader from a newer version.  You will also
    133     need to ensure that the copies of /etc/lilo.conf on each system are
    134     kept synchronised.</para>
     129    <para os="p">If you are running multiple systems on this box and using
     130    Lilo, it is a good idea to ensure that each system is running the same
     131    version of Lilo, otherwise an old version may not be able to overwrite
     132    the bootloader from a newer version. You will also need to ensure that the
     133    copies of <filename>/etc/lilo.conf</filename> on each system are kept
     134    synchronised.</para>
    135135
    136136</sect1>
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