source: patches/module-init-tools-3.6-manpages-1.patch @ ffe68ed

clfs-1.2clfs-2.1clfs-3.0.0-systemdclfs-3.0.0-sysvinitsystemdsysvinit
Last change on this file since ffe68ed was ffe68ed, checked in by Jim Gifford <clfs@…>, 14 years ago

Fixed manpages patches

  • Property mode set to 100644
File size: 34.4 KB
  • module-init-tools-3.6

    Submitted By: Jim Gifford <jim at cross-lfs dot org>
    Date: 2009-02-17
    Initial Package Version: 3.6
    Upstream Status: Unknown
    Origin: Ken Moffat <ken at linuxfromscratch dot org>
    Description: Provides the man pages (adding docbook2man with all its
                 dependencies would be a major addition to the book, so I built it
                 -once- on a completed system and saved the data).
                 Was fixed under version 3.4, but with 3.6 they are missing again
    
    diff -Naur module-init-tools-3.6.orig/depmod.8 module-init-tools-3.6/depmod.8
    old new  
     1.\" This manpage has been automatically generated by docbook2man
     2.\" from a DocBook document.  This tool can be found at:
     3.\" <http://shell.ipoline.com/~elmert/comp/docbook2X/>
     4.\" Please send any bug reports, improvements, comments, patches,
     5.\" etc. to Steve Cheng <steve@ggi-project.org>.
     6.TH "DEPMOD" "8" "17 February 2009" "" ""
     7
     8.SH NAME
     9depmod \- program to generate modules.dep and map files.
     10.SH SYNOPSIS
     11
     12\fBdepmod\fR [ \fB-b \fIbasedir\fB\fR ] [ \fB-e\fR ] [ \fB-F \fISystem.map\fB\fR ] [ \fB-n\fR ] [ \fB-v\fR ] [ \fB\fIversion\fB\fR ] [ \fB-A\fR ]
     13
     14
     15\fBdepmod\fR [ \fB-e\fR ] [ \fB-F\fISystem.map\fB\fR ] [ \fB-n\fR ] [ \fB-v\fR ] [ \fB\fIversion\fB\fR ] [ \fB\fIfilename\fB\fR\fI ...\fR ]
     16
     17.SH "DESCRIPTION"
     18.PP
     19Linux kernel modules can provide services (called "symbols") for
     20other modules to use (using EXPORT_SYMBOL in the code).  If a
     21second module uses this symbol, that second module clearly
     22depends on the first module.  These dependencies can get quite
     23complex.
     24.PP
     25\fBdepmod\fR creates a list of module dependencies,
     26by reading each module under
     27\fI/lib/modules/\fR\fIversion\fR
     28and determining what symbols it exports, and what symbols it
     29needs.  By default this list is written to
     30\fImodules.dep\fR in the same directory.  If
     31filenames are given on the command line, only those modules are
     32examined (which is rarely useful, unless all modules are
     33listed).
     34.PP
     35If a \fIversion\fR is provided, then that
     36kernel version's module directory is used, rather than the
     37current kernel version (as returned by "uname -r").
     38.PP
     39\fBdepmod\fR will also generate various map files
     40in this directory, for use by the hotplug infrastructure.
     41.SH "OPTIONS"
     42.TP
     43\fB-a --all \fR
     44Probe all modules. This option is enabled by default if no
     45file names are given in the command-line.
     46.TP
     47\fB-A --quick \fR
     48This option scans to see if any modules are newer than the
     49\fImodules.dep\fR file before any work is done:
     50if not, it silently exits rather than regenerating the files.
     51.TP
     52\fB-b \fIbasedir\fB --basedir \fIbasedir\fB \fR
     53If your modules are not currently in the (normal)
     54directory
     55\fI/lib/modules/\fR\fIversion\fR,
     56but in a staging area, you can specify a
     57\fIbasedir\fR which is prepended to
     58the directory name.  This
     59\fIbasedir\fR is stripped from the
     60resulting \fImodules.dep\fR file, so it
     61is ready to be moved into the normal location.
     62.TP
     63\fB-C --config \fIfile or directory\fB \fR
     64This option overrides the default configuration file
     65(/etc/depmod.conf or /etc/depmod.d/ if that is not found).
     66.TP
     67\fB-e --errsyms \fR
     68When combined with the \fB-F\fR option, this
     69reports any symbols which a module needs which are not
     70supplied by other modules or the kernel.  Normally, any
     71symbols not provided by modules are assumed to be
     72provided by the kernel (which should be true in a
     73perfect world).
     74.TP
     75\fB-F --filesyms \fISystem.map\fB \fR
     76Supplied with the \fISystem.map\fR produced
     77when the kernel was built, this allows the
     78\fB-e\fR option to report unresolved symbols.
     79.TP
     80\fB-h --help \fR
     81Print the help message, and exit.
     82.TP
     83\fB-n --dry-run \fR
     84This sends the resulting modules.dep, then the various
     85map files, to standard output, rather than writing them into
     86the module directory.
     87.TP
     88\fB-v --verbose \fR
     89In verbose mode \fBdepmod\fR will print (to stdout)
     90all the symbols each module depends on and the module's file name
     91which provides that symbol.
     92.TP
     93\fB-V --version \fR
     94Show version of program, and exit. See below for caveats when
     95run on older kernels.
     96.SH "BACKWARDS COMPATIBILITY"
     97.PP
     98This version of \fBdepmod\fR is for kernels
     992.5.48 and above.  If it detects a kernel
     100with support for old-style modules, or the version specified is
     101before 2.5.48, it will attempt to run
     102\fBdepmod.old\fR in its place, so it is completely
     103transparent to the user.
     104.SH "COPYRIGHT"
     105.PP
     106This manual page Copyright 2002, Rusty Russell, IBM Corporation.
     107.SH "SEE ALSO"
     108.PP
     109\fBmodprobe\fR(8),
     110\fBmodules.dep\fR(5),
     111\fBdepmod.old\fR(8)
  • module-init-tools-3.6

    diff -Naur module-init-tools-3.6.orig/depmod.conf.5 module-init-tools-3.6/depmod.conf.5
    old new  
     1.\" This manpage has been automatically generated by docbook2man
     2.\" from a DocBook document.  This tool can be found at:
     3.\" <http://shell.ipoline.com/~elmert/comp/docbook2X/>
     4.\" Please send any bug reports, improvements, comments, patches,
     5.\" etc. to Steve Cheng <steve@ggi-project.org>.
     6.TH "DEPMOD.CONF" "5" "17 February 2009" "" ""
     7
     8.SH NAME
     9depmod.conf, depmod.d \- Configuration file/directory for depmod
     10.SH "DESCRIPTION"
     11.PP
     12The order in which modules are processed by the
     13\fBdepmod\fR command can be altered on a global or
     14per-module basis. This is typically useful in cases where built-in
     15kernel modules are complemented by custom built versions of the
     16same and the user wishes to affect the priority of processing in
     17order to override the module version supplied by the kernel.
     18.PP
     19The format of \fIdepmod.conf\fR and files under \fIdepmod.d\fR is simple: one
     20command per line, with blank lines and lines starting with #
     21ignored (useful for adding comments).  A \\ at the end of a line
     22causes it to continue on the next line, which makes the file a
     23bit neater.
     24.SH "COMMANDS"
     25.TP
     26\fBsearch \fIsubdirectory...\fB \fR
     27This allows you to specify the order in which /lib/modules
     28(or other configured module location) subdirectories will
     29be processed by \fBdepmod\fR\&. Directories are
     30listed in order, with the highest priority given to the
     31first listed directory and the lowest to the last. The
     32special keyword \fBbuilt-in\fR refers to
     33the standard module directories installed by the kernel.
     34
     35By default, depmod will give a higher priority to
     36a directory with the name \fBupdates\fR
     37using this built-in search string: "updates built-in"
     38but more complex arrangements are possible and are
     39used in several popular distributions.
     40.TP
     41\fBoverride \fImodulename\fB \fIkernelversion\fB \fImodulesubdirectory\fB \fR
     42This command allows you to override which version of a
     43specific module will be used when more than one module
     44sharing the same name is processed by the
     45\fBdepmod\fR command. It is possible to
     46specify one kernel or all kernels using the * wildcard.
     47\fImodulesubdirectory\fR is the
     48name of the subdirectory under /lib/modules (or other
     49module location) where the target module is installed.
     50
     51For example, it is possible to override the priority of
     52an updated test module called \fBkmp\fR by
     53specifying the following command: "override kmp * extra".
     54This will ensure that any matching module name installed
     55under the \fBextra\fR subdirectory within
     56/lib/modules (or other module location) will take priority
     57over any likenamed module already provided by the kernel.
     58.TP
     59\fBinclude \fIfilename\fB \fR
     60Using this command, you can include other configuration
     61files, or whole directories, which is occasionally useful.
     62.SH "COPYRIGHT"
     63.PP
     64This manual page Copyright 2006, Jon Masters, Red Hat, Inc.
  • module-init-tools-3.6

    diff -Naur module-init-tools-3.6.orig/insmod.8 module-init-tools-3.6/insmod.8
    old new  
     1.\" This manpage has been automatically generated by docbook2man
     2.\" from a DocBook document.  This tool can be found at:
     3.\" <http://shell.ipoline.com/~elmert/comp/docbook2X/>
     4.\" Please send any bug reports, improvements, comments, patches,
     5.\" etc. to Steve Cheng <steve@ggi-project.org>.
     6.TH "INSMOD" "8" "17 February 2009" "" ""
     7
     8.SH NAME
     9insmod \- simple program to insert a module into the Linux Kernel
     10.SH SYNOPSIS
     11
     12\fBinsmod\fR [ \fB\fIfilename\fB\fR ] [ \fB\fImodule options\fB\fR\fI ...\fR ]
     13
     14.SH "DESCRIPTION"
     15.PP
     16\fBinsmod\fR is a trivial program to insert a
     17module into the kernel: if the
     18\fIfilename\fR is a hyphen, the module is
     19taken from standard input. Most users will want to use
     20\fBmodprobe\fR(8) instead, which is
     21cleverer.
     22.PP
     23Only the most general of error messages are reported: as the
     24work of trying to link the module is now done inside the kernel,
     25the \fBdmesg\fR usually gives more information
     26about errors.
     27.SH "BACKWARDS COMPATIBILITY"
     28.PP
     29This version of \fBinsmod\fR is for kernels
     302.5.48 and above.  If it detects a kernel
     31with support for old-style modules (for which much of the work
     32was done in userspace), it will attempt to run
     33\fBinsmod.old\fR in its place, so it is
     34completely transparent to the user.
     35.SH "COPYRIGHT"
     36.PP
     37This manual page Copyright 2002, Rusty Russell, IBM Corporation.
     38.SH "SEE ALSO"
     39.PP
     40\fBmodprobe\fR(8),
     41\fBrmmod\fR(8),
     42\fBlsmod\fR(8),
     43\fBinsmod.old\fR(8)
  • module-init-tools-3.6

    diff -Naur module-init-tools-3.6.orig/lsmod.8 module-init-tools-3.6/lsmod.8
    old new  
     1.\" This manpage has been automatically generated by docbook2man
     2.\" from a DocBook document.  This tool can be found at:
     3.\" <http://shell.ipoline.com/~elmert/comp/docbook2X/>
     4.\" Please send any bug reports, improvements, comments, patches,
     5.\" etc. to Steve Cheng <steve@ggi-project.org>.
     6.TH "LSMOD" "8" "17 February 2009" "" ""
     7
     8.SH NAME
     9lsmod \- program to show the status of modules in the Linux Kernel
     10.SH SYNOPSIS
     11
     12\fBlsmod\fR
     13
     14.SH "DESCRIPTION"
     15.PP
     16\fBlsmod\fR is a trivial program which nicely
     17formats the contents of the \fI/proc/modules\fR,
     18showing what kernel modules are currently loaded.
     19.SH "BACKWARDS COMPATIBILITY"
     20.PP
     21This version of \fBlsmod\fR is for kernels
     222.5.48 and above.  If it detects a kernel
     23with support for old-style modules, it will attempt to run
     24\fBlsmod.old\fR in its place, so it is completely
     25transparent to the user.
     26.SH "COPYRIGHT"
     27.PP
     28This manual page Copyright 2002, Rusty Russell, IBM Corporation.
     29.SH "SEE ALSO"
     30.PP
     31\fBmodprobe\fR(8),
     32\fBlsmod.old\fR(8)
  • module-init-tools-3.6

    diff -Naur module-init-tools-3.6.orig/modinfo.8 module-init-tools-3.6/modinfo.8
    old new  
     1.\" This manpage has been automatically generated by docbook2man
     2.\" from a DocBook document.  This tool can be found at:
     3.\" <http://shell.ipoline.com/~elmert/comp/docbook2X/>
     4.\" Please send any bug reports, improvements, comments, patches,
     5.\" etc. to Steve Cheng <steve@ggi-project.org>.
     6.TH "MODINFO" "8" "17 February 2009" "" ""
     7
     8.SH NAME
     9modinfo \- program to show information about a Linux Kernel module
     10.SH SYNOPSIS
     11
     12\fBmodinfo\fR [ \fB-0\fR ] [ \fB-F \fIfield\fB\fR ] [ \fB-k \fIkernel\fB\fR ] [ \fBmodulename|filename\fR\fI ...\fR ]
     13
     14
     15\fBmodinfo -V\fR
     16
     17
     18\fBmodinfo -h\fR
     19
     20.SH "DESCRIPTION"
     21.PP
     22\fBmodinfo\fR extracts information from the Linux
     23Kernel modules given on the command line.  If the module name is
     24not a filename, then the
     25\fI/lib/modules/\fR\fIversion\fR
     26directory is searched, as done by
     27\fBmodprobe\fR(8)\&.
     28.PP
     29\fBmodinfo\fR by default lists each attribute
     30of the module in form \fIfieldname\fR :
     31\fIvalue\fR, for easy reading.  The
     32filename is listed the same way (although it's not really an
     33attribute).
     34.PP
     35This version of \fBmodinfo\fR can understand
     36modules of any Linux Kernel architecture.
     37.SH "OPTIONS"
     38.TP
     39\fB-V --version \fR
     40Print the modinfo version.  Note BACKWARDS COMPATIBILITY
     41below: you might be printing the version of
     42\fBmodinfo.old\fR\&.
     43.TP
     44\fB-F --field \fR
     45Only print this field value, one per line.  This is most
     46useful for scripts.  Field names are case-insenitive.
     47Common fields (which may not be in every module) include
     48author, description,
     49license, param,
     50depends, and alias\&.
     51There are often multiple param,
     52alias and depends
     53fields.  The special field filename
     54lists the filename of the module.
     55.TP
     56\fB-k \fIkernel\fB \fR
     57Provide information about a kernel other than the running one. This
     58is particularly useful for distributions needing to extract
     59information from a newly installed (but not yet running) set of
     60kernel modules. For example, you wish to find which firmware files
     61are needed by various modules in a new kernel for which you must
     62make an initrd image prior to booting.
     63.TP
     64\fB-0 --null \fR
     65Use the ASCII zero character to separate field values,
     66instead of a new line.  This is useful for scripts, since
     67a new line can theoretically appear inside a field.
     68.TP
     69\fB-a -d -l -p -n \fR
     70These are shortcuts for author,
     71description,
     72license\&.  param and
     73filename respectively, to ease the
     74transition from the old modutils
     75\fBmodinfo\fR\&.
     76.SH "BACKWARDS COMPATIBILITY"
     77.PP
     78This version of \fBmodinfo\fR is for kernel
     79modules 2.5.48 and above.  If it detects a
     80kernel with support for old-style modules, it will attempt to
     81run \fBmodprobe.old\fR in its place, so it is
     82completely transparent to the user.
     83.PP
     84Note that the output of this version of
     85\fBmodinfo\fR is simpler and more regular than
     86the older version: scripts attempting to use the default
     87output may get confused with complex fields.
     88.PP
     89You can force the new \fBmodinfo\fR to always
     90be used, by setting the NEW_MODINFO
     91environment variable.
     92.SH "COPYRIGHT"
     93.PP
     94This manual page Copyright 2003, Rusty Russell, IBM Corporation.
     95.SH "SEE ALSO"
     96.PP
     97\fBmodprobe\fR(8),
     98\fBmodinfo.old\fR(8)
  • module-init-tools-3.6

    diff -Naur module-init-tools-3.6.orig/modprobe.8 module-init-tools-3.6/modprobe.8
    old new  
     1.\" This manpage has been automatically generated by docbook2man
     2.\" from a DocBook document.  This tool can be found at:
     3.\" <http://shell.ipoline.com/~elmert/comp/docbook2X/>
     4.\" Please send any bug reports, improvements, comments, patches,
     5.\" etc. to Steve Cheng <steve@ggi-project.org>.
     6.TH "MODPROBE" "8" "17 February 2009" "" ""
     7
     8.SH NAME
     9modprobe \- program to add and remove modules from the Linux Kernel
     10.SH SYNOPSIS
     11
     12\fBmodprobe\fR [ \fB-v\fR ] [ \fB-V\fR ] [ \fB-C \fIconfig-file\fB\fR ] [ \fB-n\fR ] [ \fB-i\fR ] [ \fB-q\fR ] [ \fB-o \fImodulename\fB\fR ] [ \fB\fImodulename\fB\fR ] [ \fB\fImodule parameters\fB\fR\fI ...\fR ]
     13
     14
     15\fBmodprobe\fR [ \fB-r\fR ] [ \fB-v\fR ] [ \fB-n\fR ] [ \fB-i\fR ] [ \fB\fImodulename\fB\fR\fI ...\fR ]
     16
     17
     18\fBmodprobe\fR [ \fB-l\fR ] [ \fB-t \fIdirname\fB\fR ] [ \fB\fIwildcard\fB\fR ]
     19
     20
     21\fBmodprobe\fR [ \fB-c\fR ]
     22
     23
     24\fBmodprobe\fR [ \fB--dump-modversions\fR ]
     25
     26.SH "DESCRIPTION"
     27.PP
     28\fBmodprobe\fR intelligently adds or removes a
     29module from the Linux kernel: note that for convenience, there
     30is no difference between _ and - in module names.
     31\fBmodprobe\fR looks in the module directory
     32\fI/lib/modules/`uname -r`\fR for all
     33the modules and other files, except for the optional
     34\fI/etc/modprobe.conf\fR configuration file and
     35\fI/etc/modprobe.d\fR directory
     36(see \fBmodprobe.conf\fR(5)). \fBmodprobe\fR will also use module
     37options specified on the kernel command line in the form of
     38<module>\&.option>\&.
     39.PP
     40Note that this version of \fBmodprobe\fR does not
     41do anything to the module itself: the work of resolving symbols
     42and understanding parameters is done inside the kernel.  So
     43module failure is sometimes accompanied by a kernel message: see
     44\fBdmesg\fR(8)\&.
     45.PP
     46\fBmodprobe\fR expects an up-to-date
     47\fImodules.dep\fR file, as generated by
     48\fBdepmod\fR (see \fBdepmod\fR(8)).  This file lists what other modules each
     49module needs (if any), and \fBmodprobe\fR uses this
     50to add or remove these dependencies automatically.  See
     51\fBmodules.dep\fR(5)).
     52.PP
     53If any arguments are given after the
     54\fImodulename\fR, they are passed to the
     55kernel (in addition to any options listed in the configuration
     56file).
     57.SH "OPTIONS"
     58.TP
     59\fB-v --verbose \fR
     60Print messages about what the program is doing.  Usually
     61\fBmodprobe\fR only prints messages if
     62something goes wrong.
     63
     64This option is passed through \fBinstall\fR
     65or \fBremove\fR commands to other
     66\fBmodprobe\fR commands in the
     67MODPROBE_OPTIONS environment variable.
     68.TP
     69\fB-C --config \fR
     70This option overrides the default configuration file
     71(\fI/etc/modprobe.conf\fR or
     72\fI/etc/modprobe.d/\fR if that isn't found).
     73
     74This option is passed through \fBinstall\fR
     75or \fBremove\fR commands to other
     76\fBmodprobe\fR commands in the
     77MODPROBE_OPTIONS environment variable.
     78.TP
     79\fB-c --showconfig \fR
     80Dump out the configuration file and exit.
     81.TP
     82\fB-n --dry-run \fR
     83This option does everything but actually insert or
     84delete the modules (or run the install or remove
     85commands).  Combined with \fB-v\fR, it is
     86useful for debugging problems.
     87.TP
     88\fB-i --ignore-install --ignore-remove \fR
     89This option causes \fBmodprobe\fR to
     90ignore \fBinstall\fR and
     91\fBremove\fR commands in the
     92configuration file (if any), for the module on the
     93command line (any dependent modules are still subject
     94to commands set for them in the configuration file).
     95See \fBmodprobe.conf\fR(5)\&.
     96.TP
     97\fB-q --quiet \fR
     98Normally \fBmodprobe\fR will report an error
     99if you try to remove or insert a module it can't find (and
     100isn't an alias or
     101\fBinstall\fR/\fBremove\fR
     102command).  With this flag, \fBmodprobe\fR
     103will simply ignore any bogus names (the kernel uses this
     104to opportunistically probe for modules which might exist).
     105.TP
     106\fB-r --remove \fR
     107This option causes \fBmodprobe\fR to remove,
     108rather than insert a module.  If the modules it depends on
     109are also unused, \fBmodprobe\fR will try to
     110remove them, too.  Unlike insertion, more than one module
     111can be specified on the command line (it does not make
     112sense to specify module parameters when removing modules).
     113
     114There is usually no reason to remove modules, but some
     115buggy modules require it.  Your kernel may not support
     116removal of modules.
     117.TP
     118\fB-w --wait \fR
     119This option is applicable only with the -r or --remove option.
     120It causes modprobe to block in the kernel (within the kernel
     121module handling code itself) waiting for the specified modules'
     122reference count to reach zero. Default operation is for modprobe
     123to operate like rmmod, which exits with EWOULDBLOCK if the
     124modules reference count is non-zero.
     125.TP
     126\fB-V --version \fR
     127Show version of program, and exit.  See below for caveats when run on older kernels.
     128.TP
     129\fB-f --force \fR
     130Try to strip any versioning information from the module,
     131which might otherwise stop it from loading: this is the
     132same as using both \fB--force-vermagic\fR and
     133\fB--force-modversion\fR\&.  Naturally, these
     134checks are there for your protection, so using this option
     135is dangerous.
     136
     137This applies to any modules inserted: both the module (or
     138alias) on the command line, and any modules it depends on.
     139.TP
     140\fB--force-vermagic \fR
     141Every module contains a small string containing important
     142information, such as the kernel and compiler versions.  If
     143a module fails to load and the kernel complains that the
     144"version magic" doesn't match, you can use this option to
     145remove it.  Naturally, this check is there for your
     146protection, so this using option is dangerous.
     147
     148This applies to any modules inserted: both the module (or
     149alias) on the command line, and any modules it depends on.
     150.TP
     151\fB--force-modversion \fR
     152When modules are compiled with CONFIG_MODVERSIONS set, a
     153section is created detailing the versions of every
     154interface used by (or supplied by) the module.  If a
     155module fails to load and the kernel complains that the
     156module disagrees about a version of some interface, you
     157can use "--force-modversion" to remove the version
     158information altogether.  Naturally, this check is there
     159for your protection, so using this option is dangerous.
     160
     161This applies any modules inserted: both the module (or
     162alias) on the command line, and any modules it depends on.
     163.TP
     164\fB-l --list \fR
     165List all modules matching the given wildcard (or "*"
     166if no wildcard is given).  This option is provided for
     167backwards compatibility: see
     168\fBfind\fR(1) and
     169\fBbasename\fR(1) for a more flexible alternative.
     170.TP
     171\fB-a --all \fR
     172Insert all module names on the command line.
     173.TP
     174\fB-t --type \fR
     175Restrict \fB-l\fR to modules
     176in directories matching the
     177\fIdirname\fR given.  This option
     178is provided for backwards compatibility: see
     179\fBfind\fR(1)
     180and
     181\fBbasename\fR(1) or a more flexible alternative.
     182.TP
     183\fB-s --syslog \fR
     184This option causes any error messages to go through the
     185syslog mechanism (as LOG_DAEMON with level LOG_NOTICE)
     186rather than to standard error.  This is also automatically
     187enabled when stderr is unavailable.
     188
     189This option is passed through \fBinstall\fR
     190or \fBremove\fR commands to other
     191\fBmodprobe\fR commands in the
     192MODPROBE_OPTIONS environment variable.
     193.TP
     194\fB--set-version \fR
     195Set the kernel version, rather than using
     196\fBuname\fR(2) to decide on the kernel version (which dictates where to
     197find the modules).  This also disables backwards
     198compatibility checks (so
     199\fBmodprobe.old\fR(8) will never be run).
     200.TP
     201\fB--show-depends \fR
     202List the dependencies of a module (or alias), including
     203the module itself.  This produces a (possibly empty) set
     204of module filenames, one per line, each starting with
     205"insmod".  Install commands which apply are shown prefixed by
     206"install".  It does not run any of the install commands.  Note that
     207\fBmodinfo\fR(8)
     208can be used to extract dependencies of a module from the
     209module itself, but knows nothing of aliases or install commands.
     210.TP
     211\fB-o --name \fR
     212This option tries to rename the module which is being
     213inserted into the kernel.  Some testing modules can
     214usefully be inserted multiple times, but the kernel
     215refuses to have two modules of the same name.  Normally,
     216modules should not require multiple insertions, as that
     217would make them useless if there were no module support.
     218.TP
     219\fB--first-time \fR
     220Normally, \fBmodprobe\fR will succeed (and do
     221nothing) if told to insert a module which is already
     222present, or remove a module which isn't present.  This is
     223backwards compatible with the modutils, and ideal for
     224simple scripts.  However, more complicated scripts often
     225want to know whether \fBmodprobe\fR really
     226did something: this option makes modprobe fail for that
     227case.
     228.TP
     229\fB--dump-modversions \fR
     230Print out a list of module versioning information required by a
     231module. This option is commonly used by distributions in order to
     232package up a Linuxx kernel module using module versioning deps.
     233.TP
     234\fB--use-blacklist \fR
     235This option causes \fBmodprobe\fR to apply the
     236\fBblacklist\fR commands in the configuration file (if
     237any) to module names as well.  It is usually used by \fBudev\fR(7)\&.
     238.SH "BACKWARDS COMPATIBILITY"
     239.PP
     240This version of \fBmodprobe\fR is for kernels
     2412.5.48 and above.  If it detects a kernel
     242with support for old-style modules (for which much of the work
     243was done in userspace), it will attempt to run
     244\fBmodprobe.old\fR in its place, so it is
     245completely transparent to the user.
     246.SH "ENVIRONMENT"
     247.PP
     248The MODPROBE_OPTIONS environment variable can also be used to
     249pass arguments to \fBmodprobe\fR\&.
     250.SH "COPYRIGHT"
     251.PP
     252This manual page Copyright 2002, Rusty Russell, IBM Corporation.
     253.SH "SEE ALSO"
     254.PP
     255\fBmodprobe.conf\fR(5),
     256\fBlsmod\fR(8),
     257\fBmodprobe.old\fR(8)
  • module-init-tools-3.6

    diff -Naur module-init-tools-3.6.orig/modprobe.conf.5 module-init-tools-3.6/modprobe.conf.5
    old new  
     1.\" This manpage has been automatically generated by docbook2man
     2.\" from a DocBook document.  This tool can be found at:
     3.\" <http://shell.ipoline.com/~elmert/comp/docbook2X/>
     4.\" Please send any bug reports, improvements, comments, patches,
     5.\" etc. to Steve Cheng <steve@ggi-project.org>.
     6.TH "MODPROBE.CONF" "5" "17 February 2009" "" ""
     7
     8.SH NAME
     9modprobe.conf, modprobe.d \- Configuration file/directory for modprobe
     10.SH "DESCRIPTION"
     11.PP
     12Because the \fBmodprobe\fR command can add or
     13remove extra more than one module, due to module dependencies,
     14we need a method of specifying what options are to be used with
     15those modules.  \fI/etc/modprobe.conf\fR (or, if that does not exist, all files under the \fI/etc/modprobe.d\fR directory) specifies
     16those options, as required.  It can also be used to create
     17convenient aliases: alternate names for a module.  Finally, it
     18can override the normal \fBmodprobe\fR behavior
     19altogether, for those with very special requirements (such as
     20inserting more than one module).
     21.PP
     22Note that module and alias names (like other module names) can
     23have - or _ in them: both are interchangable throughout all the
     24module commands.
     25.PP
     26The format of \fImodprobe.conf\fR and files under \fImodprobe.d\fR is simple: one
     27command per line, with blank lines and lines starting with #
     28ignored (useful for adding comments).  A \\ at the end of a line
     29causes it to continue on the next line, which makes the file a
     30bit neater.
     31.PP
     32The syntax is a simplification of \fImodules.conf\fR, used in 2.4 kernels and earlier.
     33.SH "COMMANDS"
     34.TP
     35\fBalias \fIwildcard\fB \fImodulename\fB \fR
     36This allows you to give alternate names for a module.  For
     37example: "alias my-mod really_long_modulename"
     38means you can use "modprobe my-mod" instead of "modprobe
     39really_long_modulename".  You can also use shell-style
     40wildcards, so "alias my-mod* really_long_modulename"
     41means that "modprobe my-mod-something" has the same
     42effect.  You can't have aliases to other aliases (that
     43way lies madness), but aliases can have options, which
     44will be added to any other options.
     45
     46Note that modules can also contain their own aliases,
     47which you can see using \fBmodinfo\fR\&.  These
     48aliases are used as a last resort (ie. if there is no real
     49module, \fBinstall\fR,
     50\fBremove\fR, or \fBalias\fR
     51command in the configuration).
     52.TP
     53\fBoptions \fImodulename\fB \fIoption...\fB \fR
     54This command allows you to add options to the module
     55\fImodulename\fR (which might be an
     56alias) every time it is inserted into the kernel: whether
     57directly (using \fBmodprobe\fR
     58\fImodulename\fR, or because the
     59module being inserted depends on this module.
     60
     61All options are added together: they can come from an
     62\fBoption\fR for the module itself, for an
     63alias, and on the command line.
     64.TP
     65\fBinstall \fImodulename\fB \fIcommand...\fB \fR
     66This is the most powerful primitive in
     67\fImodprobe.conf\fR: it tells
     68\fBmodprobe\fR to run your command instead of
     69inserting the module in the kernel as normal.  The command
     70can be any shell command: this allows you to do any kind
     71of complex processing you might wish.  For example, if the
     72module "fred" worked better with the module "barney"
     73already installed (but it didn't depend on it, so
     74\fBmodprobe\fR won't automatically load it),
     75you could say "install fred /sbin/modprobe barney;
     76/sbin/modprobe --ignore-install fred", which would do what
     77you wanted.  Note the \fB--ignore-install\fR,
     78which stops the second \fBmodprobe\fR from
     79re-running the same \fBinstall\fR command.
     80See also \fBremove\fR below.
     81
     82You can also use \fBinstall\fR to make up
     83modules which don't otherwise exist.  For example:
     84"install probe-ethernet /sbin/modprobe e100 ||
     85/sbin/modprobe eepro100", which will try first the e100
     86driver, then the eepro100 driver, when you do "modprobe
     87probe-ethernet".
     88
     89If you use the string "$CMDLINE_OPTS" in the command, it
     90will be replaced by any options specified on the modprobe
     91command line.  This can be useful because users expect
     92"modprobe fred opt=1" to pass the "opt=1" arg to the
     93module, even if there's an install command in the
     94configuration file.  So our above example becomes "install
     95fred /sbin/modprobe barney; /sbin/modprobe
     96--ignore-install fred $CMDLINE_OPTS"
     97.TP
     98\fBremove \fImodulename\fB \fIcommand...\fB \fR
     99This is similar to the \fBinstall\fR command
     100above, except it is invoked when "modprobe -r" is run.
     101The removal counterparts to the two examples above would
     102be: "remove fred /sbin/modprobe -r --ignore-remove fred &&
     103/sbin/modprobe -r barney", and "remove probe-ethernet
     104/sbin/modprobe -r eepro100 || /sbin/modprobe -r e100".
     105.TP
     106\fBinclude \fIfilename\fB \fR
     107Using this command, you can include other configuration
     108files, or whole directories, which is occasionally useful.  Note that aliases in
     109the included file will override aliases previously
     110declared in the current file.
     111.TP
     112\fBblacklist \fImodulename\fB \fR
     113Modules can contain their own aliases: usually these are
     114aliases describing the devices they support, such as
     115"pci:123...".  These "internal" aliases can be overridden
     116by normal "alias" keywords, but there are cases where two
     117or more modules both support the same devices, or a module
     118invalidly claims to support a device: the
     119\fBblacklist\fR keyword indicates that all of
     120that particular module's internal aliases are to be ignored.
     121.SH "BACKWARDS COMPATIBILITY"
     122.PP
     123There is a \fBgenerate_modprobe.conf\fR program
     124which should do a reasonable job of generating
     125\fImodprobe.conf\fR from your current (2.4 or
     1262.2) modules setup.
     127.PP
     128Although the syntax is similar to the older
     129\fI/etc/modules.conf\fR, there are many features
     130missing.  There are two reasons for this: firstly, install and
     131remove commands can do just about anything, and secondly, the
     132module-init-tools modprobe is designed to be simple enough that
     133it can be easily replaced.
     134.PP
     135With the complexity of actual module insertion reduced to three
     136system calls (open, read, init_module), and the
     137\fImodules.dep\fR file being simple and open,
     138producing a more powerful modprobe variant can be done
     139independently if there is a need.
     140.SH "COPYRIGHT"
     141.PP
     142This manual page Copyright 2004, Rusty Russell, IBM Corporation.
     143.SH "SEE ALSO"
     144.PP
     145\fBmodprobe\fR(8),
     146\fBmodules.dep\fR(5)
  • module-init-tools-3.6

    diff -Naur module-init-tools-3.6.orig/modules.dep.5 module-init-tools-3.6/modules.dep.5
    old new  
     1.\" This manpage has been automatically generated by docbook2man
     2.\" from a DocBook document.  This tool can be found at:
     3.\" <http://shell.ipoline.com/~elmert/comp/docbook2X/>
     4.\" Please send any bug reports, improvements, comments, patches,
     5.\" etc. to Steve Cheng <steve@ggi-project.org>.
     6.TH "MODULES.DEP" "5" "17 February 2009" "" ""
     7
     8.SH NAME
     9modules.dep \- List of module dependencies
     10.SH "DESCRIPTION"
     11.PP
     12The \fImodules.dep\fR as generated by
     13module-init-tools \fBdepmod\fR, lists the
     14dependencies for every module in the directories under
     15\fI/lib/modules/\fR\fIversion\fR,
     16where \fImodules.dep\fR is.
     17.PP
     18Blank lines, and lines starting with a '#' (ignoring spaces) are
     19ignored.  Other lines are of the form "filename: [filename]*",
     20listing the complete dependencies for the first filename in
     21descending order.
     22.PP
     23For example, if
     24\fI/lib/modules/2.5.53/kernel/a.ko\fR depended on
     25\fIb.ko\fR and \fIc.ko\fR in the
     26same directory, and \fIc.ko\fR depended on
     27\fIb.ko\fR as well, the file might look like:
     28
     29.nf
     30# This is a comment.
     31/lib/modules/2.5.53/kernel/a.ko: /lib/modules/2.5.53/kernel/c.ko /lib/modules/2.5.53/kernel/b.ko
     32/lib/modules/2.5.53/kernel/b.ko:
     33/lib/modules/2.5.53/kernel/c.ko: /lib/modules/2.5.53/kernel/b.ko
     34   
     35.fi
     36.PP
     37This file is used by \fBmodprobe\fR to know the
     38order to load modules (they are loaded right to left, and
     39removed left to right).
     40.SH "COPYRIGHT"
     41.PP
     42This manual page Copyright 2002, Rusty Russell, IBM Corporation.
     43.SH "SEE ALSO"
     44.PP
     45\fBmodprobe\fR(8)
  • module-init-tools-3.6

    diff -Naur module-init-tools-3.6.orig/rmmod.8 module-init-tools-3.6/rmmod.8
    old new  
     1.\" This manpage has been automatically generated by docbook2man
     2.\" from a DocBook document.  This tool can be found at:
     3.\" <http://shell.ipoline.com/~elmert/comp/docbook2X/>
     4.\" Please send any bug reports, improvements, comments, patches,
     5.\" etc. to Steve Cheng <steve@ggi-project.org>.
     6.TH "RMMOD" "8" "17 February 2009" "" ""
     7
     8.SH NAME
     9rmmod \- simple program to remove a module from the Linux Kernel
     10.SH SYNOPSIS
     11
     12\fBrmmod\fR [ \fB-f\fR ] [ \fB-w\fR ] [ \fB-s\fR ] [ \fB-v\fR ] [ \fB\fImodulename\fB\fR ]
     13
     14.SH "DESCRIPTION"
     15.PP
     16\fBrmmod\fR is a trivial program to remove a
     17module from the kernel.  Most users will want to use
     18\fBmodprobe\fR(8) instead, with the \fB-r\fR option.
     19.SH "OPTIONS"
     20.TP
     21\fB-v --verbose \fR
     22Print messages about what the program is doing.
     23Usually \fBrmmod\fR only prints messages
     24if something goes wrong.
     25.TP
     26\fB-f --force \fR
     27This option can be extremely dangerous: it has no effect unless
     28CONFIG_MODULE_FORCE_UNLOAD was set when the kernel was
     29compiled.  With this option, you can remove modules which are
     30being used, or which are not designed to be removed, or have
     31been marked as unsafe (see \fBlsmod\fR(8)).
     32.TP
     33\fB-w --wait \fR
     34Normally, \fBrmmod\fR will refuse to
     35unload modules which are in use.  With this option,
     36\fBrmmod\fR will isolate the module, and
     37wait until the module is no longer used.  Noone new
     38will be able to use the module, but it's up to you to
     39make sure the current users eventually finish with it.
     40See \fBlsmod\fR(8)) for information on usage counts.
     41.TP
     42\fB-s --syslog \fR
     43Send errors to the syslog, instead of standard error.
     44.TP
     45\fB-V --version \fR
     46Show version of program, and exit.  See below for caveats
     47when run on older kernels.
     48.SH "BACKWARDS COMPATIBILITY"
     49.PP
     50This version of \fBrmmod\fR is for kernels
     512.5.48 and above.  If it detects a kernel
     52with support for old-style modules (for which much of the work
     53was done in userspace), it will attempt to run
     54\fBrmmod.old\fR in its place, so it is completely
     55transparent to the user.
     56.SH "COPYRIGHT"
     57.PP
     58This manual page Copyright 2002, Rusty Russell, IBM Corporation.
     59.SH "SEE ALSO"
     60.PP
     61\fBmodprobe\fR(8),
     62\fBinsmod\fR(8),
     63\fBlsmod\fR(8),
     64\fBrmmod.old\fR(8)
Note: See TracBrowser for help on using the repository browser.