source: BOOK/bootscripts/common/network.xml @ 3f8be484

clfs-1.2clfs-2.1clfs-3.0.0-systemdclfs-3.0.0-sysvinitsystemdsysvinit
Last change on this file since 3f8be484 was 3f8be484, checked in by Jim Gifford <clfs@…>, 13 years ago

r627@server (orig r625): jim | 2005-10-31 12:59:34 -0800
Import of Cross-LFS Book

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1<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
2<!DOCTYPE sect1 PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DocBook XML V4.4//EN"
3  "http://www.oasis-open.org/docbook/xml/4.4/docbookx.dtd" [
4  <!ENTITY % general-entities SYSTEM "../../general.ent">
5  %general-entities;
6]>
7
8<sect1 id="ch-scripts-network">
9  <?dbhtml filename="network.html"?>
10
11  <title>Configuring the network Script</title>
12
13  <indexterm zone="ch-scripts-network">
14    <primary sortas="d-network">network</primary>
15  <secondary>configuring</secondary></indexterm>
16
17  <para>This section only applies if a network card is to be
18  configured.</para>
19
20  <para>If a network card will not be used, there is likely no need to
21  create any configuration files relating to network cards. If that is
22  the case, remove the <filename class="symlink">network</filename>
23  symlinks from all run-level directories (<filename
24  class="directory">/etc/rc.d/rc*.d</filename>).</para>
25
26  <sect2>
27    <title>Creating Network Interface Configuration Files</title>
28
29    <para>Which interfaces are brought up and down by the network script
30    depends on the files and directories in the <filename
31    class="directory">/etc/sysconfig/network-devices</filename> hierarchy.
32    This directory should contain a sub-directory for each interface to be
33    configured, such as <filename>ifconfig.xyz</filename>, where
34    <quote>xyz</quote> is a network interface name. Inside this directory
35    would be files defining the attributes to this interface, such as its
36    IP address(es), subnet masks, and so forth.</para>
37
38    <para>The following command creates a sample <filename>ipv4</filename>
39    file for the <filename class="devicefile">eth0</filename> device:</para>
40
41<screen><userinput>cd /etc/sysconfig/network-devices &amp;&amp;
42mkdir ifconfig.eth0 &amp;&amp;
43cat &gt; ifconfig.eth0/ipv4 &lt;&lt; "EOF"
44<literal>ONBOOT=yes
45SERVICE=ipv4-static
46IP=192.168.1.1
47GATEWAY=192.168.1.2
48PREFIX=24
49BROADCAST=192.168.1.255</literal>
50EOF</userinput></screen>
51
52    <para>The values of these variables must be changed in every file to
53    match the proper setup. If the <envar>ONBOOT</envar> variable is
54    set to <quote>yes</quote> the network script will bring up the
55    Network Interface Card (NIC) during booting of the system. If set
56    to anything but <quote>yes</quote> the NIC will be ignored by the
57    network script and not brought up.</para>
58
59    <para>The <envar>SERVICE</envar> variable defines the method used for
60    obtaining the IP address. The LFS-Bootscripts package has a modular IP
61    assignment format, and creating additional files in the <filename
62    class="directory">/etc/sysconfig/network-devices/services</filename>
63    directory allows other IP assignment methods. This is commonly used
64    for Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), which is addressed in
65    the BLFS book.</para>
66
67    <para>The <envar>GATEWAY</envar> variable should contain the default
68    gateway IP address, if one is present. If not, then comment out the
69    variable entirely.</para>
70
71    <para>The <envar>PREFIX</envar> variable needs to contain the number
72    of bits used in the subnet. Each octet in an IP address is 8 bits.
73    If the subnet's netmask is 255.255.255.0, then it is using the first
74    three octets (24 bits) to specify the network number. If the netmask
75    is 255.255.255.240, it would be using the first 28 bits. Prefixes
76    longer than 24 bits are commonly used by DSL and cable-based Internet
77    Service Providers (ISPs). In this example (PREFIX=24), the netmask is
78    255.255.255.0. Adjust the <envar>PREFIX</envar> variable according to
79    your specific subnet.</para>
80
81  </sect2>
82
83  <sect2 id="resolv.conf">
84    <title>Creating the /etc/resolv.conf File</title>
85
86    <indexterm zone="resolv.conf">
87      <primary sortas="e-/etc/resolv.conf">/etc/resolv.conf</primary>
88    </indexterm>
89
90    <para>If the system is going to be connected to the Internet, it will
91    need some means of Domain Name Service (DNS) name resolution to resolve
92    Internet domain names to IP addresses, and vice versa. This is best
93    achieved by placing the IP address of the DNS server, available from
94    the ISP or network administrator, into <filename>/etc/resolv.conf</filename>.
95    Create the file by running the following:</para>
96
97<screen><userinput>cat &gt; /etc/resolv.conf &lt;&lt; "EOF"
98<literal># Begin /etc/resolv.conf
99
100domain {<replaceable>[Your Domain Name]</replaceable>}
101nameserver <replaceable>[IP address of your primary nameserver]</replaceable>
102nameserver <replaceable>[IP address of your secondary nameserver]</replaceable>
103
104# End /etc/resolv.conf</literal>
105EOF</userinput></screen>
106
107    <para>Replace <replaceable>[IP address of the nameserver]</replaceable>
108    with the IP address of the DNS most appropriate for the setup. There will
109    often be more than one entry (requirements demand secondary servers for
110    fallback capability). If you only need or want one DNS server, remove the
111    second <emphasis>nameserver</emphasis> line from the file. The IP address
112    may also be a router on the local network.</para>
113
114  </sect2>
115
116</sect1>
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